Apprenticeships for Parents & Teachers

First of all, let us debunk the top 5 myths about choosing an apprenticeship as a career option:

  1. Apprenticeships are not for high achieving students – you can attain a qualification equivalent to a degree under the apprenticeship scheme.
  2. Apprenticeships are at a disadvantage as they are not a degree – with so many graduates competing for the same jobs real work experience is now considered more important that a degree in many employment decisions.
  3. Apprenticeships are only available for the trades and manual skilled or blue collar jobs – apprenticeships are now available in almost every industry sector, from advertising and marketing to volunteer management or activity leadership to vetinary nursing.
  4. University students have better career prospects – the career starts the same day as the apprenticeship, there’s not three years of waiting before starting a career.
  5. University graduates earn more than former apprentices – A third of all apprentices received a promotion within a year of finishing, and in their lifetime can earn £150,000 more than their peers without an apprenticeship.

Depending on the student’s academic achievements, he or she will start an apprenticeship and within one to four years could have earned a foundation degree all while being on the payroll of a forward-thinking employer who has their interests and future in mind.

An apprenticeship is a good option, what next?
If your child or student is considering an apprenticeship, check out this flow chart to see the next steps.

1) Choose from over 200 apprenticeships

2) Find the right employer offering the apprenticeship – this can be done in three ways:

  • a. Via a training provider for that type of apprenticeship
  • b. Respond direct to the employer’s advertisement
  • c. Approach a business that you want to work for and suggest they take on an apprentice

3) Submit your CV and a covering letter detailing why you are right for the opportunity

4) Attend any interviews that you are invited to

5) Upon a successful interview you will be informed of the start date. If the interview wasn’t successful, the employer should provide constructive feedback to help you improve your skills.

FAQs

1. What is an apprenticeship?

Apprenticeships are paid positions of employment that incorporate on and off the job training. A successful apprentice will qualify with a nationally recognised qualification (NVQ) on completion of their training programme. Most employers will hope that the apprentice will stay with the company, gain further job experience and progress in the organisation.

2. How long is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship will last for a minimum of 12 months, and can start at any time during the year.

3. When does an apprenticeship start and end?

Apprenticeships can start at any time of the year and will continue for as long as it takes for the student to complete the level(s) that they would like to. One level typically takes between 12-15 months.

4. What qualification will my child / student attain via an apprenticeship?

See this helpful table:

Apprenticeship Type

Equivalent to

NVQ level

Apprenticeship Type Foundation apprenticeship

Equivalent to Entry level education

NVQ level Entry level

Apprenticeship Type Foundation apprenticeship

Equivalent to GCSEs grades D-G

NVQ level Level 1

Apprenticeship Type Intermediate apprenticeship

Equivalent to GCSEs grade A*-C

NVQ level Level 2

Apprenticeship Type Advanced apprenticeship

Equivalent to Entry level education

NVQ level Level 3

Apprenticeship Type Higher apprenticeship

Equivalent to Foundation degree or diploma

NVQ level Level 4/5

Apprenticeship Type Degree apprenticeship

Equivalent to Degree

NVQ level Level 5/6

5. Is an apprenticeship inferior to a degree?

No. It is possible to attain a qualification equivalent to a degree under the apprenticeship scheme and the apprentice is paid a salary, as well as gaining industry experience unlike a university student.

6. What is the main difference between going to university and doing an apprenticeship?

Apprenticeships really kick start an individual’s professional life, whilst earning a salary. They are for smart, forward-thinking individuals who want to get on the career ladder straight away, and learn whilst in employment. University is for those who choose academia and defer starting employment until they have a degree.

7. Is my child / student going to need to move away from home?

There are hundreds of apprenticeship opportunities in your area, so they shouldn’t need to move away, unless they choose to look for an apprenticeship framework further afield.

8. How does my child / student choose the right apprenticeship?

With so much choice (apprenticeships cover over 1200 different job roles), it’s vital that he or she spends a good amount of time considering the following:

  • What do you love doing? If you choose a career that you love, you’ll never work a day in your life!
  • What motivates you? If it’s money, then check out the salaries for the sectors and jobs that interest you most. If it’s work / life balance, then speak to a few people in that profession and ask what the average working week is like.
  • What are you good at? That’s half the battle won, if you can lean on your strengths in your new role.
  • What is the future of the professions that interest you? Make sure you choose a profession that has good prospects. A librarian, for example, might not exist in the not so distant future, so it’s best to think about what demand there is for the role that you choose.

9. How does my child / student find an apprenticeship locally?

Find the right employer offering the apprenticeship – this can be done in three ways:

  • Via a training provider for that type of apprenticeship
  • Respond direct to the employer’s advertisement
  • Approach a business that he / she wants to work for and suggest they take on an apprentice
    • Submit his / her CV and a covering letter detailing why they are right for the opportunity
    • Attend any interviews that they are invited to
    • Upon a successful interview he / she will be informed of the start date. If the interview wasn’t successful, the employer should provide constructive feedback to help them improve their interview skills.
  • 10. Are apprenticeships funded by the government?

    Yes. The government invests in raising awareness of apprenticeships to improve the level of skills attained by 16-24 year olds in the UK. The government also pays a grant of £1500 to every business that employs an apprentice.

    11. How is my local council involved in apprenticeships?

    Sutton Council’s ‘Opportunity Sutton’ department has been allocated budget to help support parents, teachers, students and employers to come together and make apprenticeships the higher education option of choice, leading to the set-up of the Sutton Apprenticeship Hub.

    The Council employ approximately 30 apprentices per year to give young people a chance to explore the public sector. Read Charlotte’s story here

    To encourage young people to get involved in the movement the Education Business Partnership works with schools and partners to promote the apprenticeship pathway.

    • Step

      1

      Choose from over 200 apprenticeships.

      From building planes to herding cattle, apprenticeships come in all shapes and sizes. You can find a whole host of apprenticeships using our jobs page!

      Find An Apprenticeship
      Step

      2

      Find The Right Employer.

      To find the right employer offering an apprenticeship, you can go through a training provider for that type of apprenticeship, respond directly to the employer's advertisement, or approach any business directly and suggest they should take on an apprentice.

      Step

      3

      Application.

      You may be required to complete an application form and submit your CV and a covering letter detailing why you are right for the opportunity.

      Step

      4

      Attend Your Interview.

      If your application is successful you will be invited to attend an interview. This is a vital step in securing your apprenticeship. Make sure you're prepared!

      Step

      5

      After Your Interview.

      Upon a successful interview you will be informed of the start date. If the interview wasn’t successful, the employer should provide constructive feedback to help you improve your skills.